11+ PRE-TEST & 13+ ENTRANCE

Boys usually enter UK independent schools (traditionally called public schools) into Year 9 at age 13. However, the 13+ entrance process starts much earlier.

Many of the major schools run a preliminary 11+ pre-test, taken in Year 6 – though often the deadline for registration is two years before the proposed start date. A child’s performance in the pre-test determines whether they are offered a 13+ place, which is conditional on passing the Common Entrance exams in Year 8. The school might suggest that a candidate takes the more challenging Common Entrance Scholarship exam.

We have a long and successful track record in helping students prepare for the 13+ Common Entrance and Scholarship exams, as well as helping boys gain entry into major UK schools such as Westminster, St. Paul’s, Winchester, Harrow and Eton among many others.

The Common Entrance and Scholarship exams test a wide range of subjects including science, a modern foreign language and the humanities. They are set by the Independent Schools Examination Board. Many of the most selective schools have additional entry procedures to distinguish further between the very best candidates.

“We have a long and successful track record in helping students prepare for the 13+ Common Entrance and Scholarship exams.”

How We Can Help

Passing these exams is of paramount importance to ensure entry to your first choice of secondary school.  We prepare students for these exams thoroughly, building a unique course of tuition for each pupil.

We can assist with:

  • 11+ Pre Test Examinations
  • 13+ Common Entrance Examinations

All tuition programmes will:

  • Ensure all curriculum areas and subject matter is covered and understood
  • Ensure familiarity with exam format and working under timed conditions
  • Create a positive approach and attitude to the examinations

To discuss how we can help you, please email dubai@hollandparkeducation.com or call +971 (0) 4 313 2977

 

CONTACT US NOW

  • “We believe that decisions about education should be exciting, not bewildering.”